Introduction To Statistical Mechanics By Roger Bowley Free Download Pdf

Introductory Statistical Mechanics
by Roger Bowley, Mariana Sánchez

This book explains the ideas and techniques of statistical mechanics-the theory of condensed matter-in a simple and progressive way. The text starts with the laws of thermodynamics and simple ideas of quantum mechanics. The conceptual ideas underlying the subject are explained carefully; themathematical ideas are developed in parallel to give a coherent overall view. The text is illustrated with examples not just from solid state physics, but also from recent theories of radiation from black holes and recent data on the background radiation from the Cosmic background explorer. In thissecond edition, slightly more advanced material on statistical mechanics is introduced, material which students should meet in an undergraduate course. As a result the new edition contains three more chapters on phase transitions at an appropriate level for an undergraduate student. There are plentyof problems at the end of each chapter, and brief model answers are provided for odd-numbered problems. From reviews of the first edition: ‘…Introductory Statistical Mechanics is clear and crisp and takes advantage of the best parts of the many approaches to the subject’ Physics Today

Equilibrium Thermodynamics
by C. J. Adkins, Clement John Adkins

Equilibrium Thermodynamics gives a comprehensive but concise course in the fundamentals of classical thermodynamics. Although the subject is essentially classical in nature, illustrative material is drawn widely from modern physics and free use is made of microscopic ideas to illuminate it. The overriding objective in writing the book was to achieve a clear exposition: to give an account of the subject that it both stimulating and easy to learn from. Classical thermodynamics has such wide application that it can be taught in many ways. The terms of reference for Equilibrium Thermodynamics are primarily those of the undergraduate physicist; but it is also suitable for courses in chemistry, engineering, materials science etc. The subject is usually taught in the first or second year of an undergraduate course, but the book takes the student to degree standard (and beyond). Prerequisites are elementary or school-level thermal physics.

An Introduction to Statistical Thermodynamics
by Terrell L. Hill

“A large number of exercises of a broad range of difficulty make this book even more useful…a good addition to the literature on thermodynamics at the undergraduate level.” — Philosophical Magazine
Although written on an introductory level, this wide-ranging text provides extensive coverage of topics of current interest in equilibrium statistical mechanics. Indeed, certain traditional topics are given somewhat condensed treatment to allow room for a survey of more recent advances.
The book is divided into four major sections. Part I deals with the principles of quantum statistical mechanics and includes discussions of energy levels, states and eigenfunctions, degeneracy and other topics. Part II examines systems composed of independent molecules or of other independent subsystems. Topics range from ideal monatomic gas and monatomic crystals to polyatomic gas and configuration of polymer molecules and rubber elasticity. An examination of systems of interacting molecules comprises the nine chapters in Part Ill, reviewing such subjects as lattice statistics, imperfect gases and dilute liquid solutions. Part IV covers quantum statistics and includes sections on Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein statistics, photon gas and free-volume theories of quantum liquids.
Each chapter includes problems varying in difficulty — ranging from simple numerical exercises to small-scale “research” propositions. In addition, supplementary reading lists for each chapter invite students to pursue the subject at a more advanced level. Readers are assumed to have studied thermodynamics, calculus, elementary differential equations and elementary quantum mechanics.
Because of the flexibility of the chapter arrangements, this book especially lends itself to use in a one-or two-semester graduate course in chemistry, a one-semester senior or graduate course in physics or an introductory course in statistical mechanics.


Fundamentals of Condensed Matter and Crystalline Physics
by David L. Sidebottom

This undergraduate textbook merges traditional solid state physics with contemporary condensed matter physics, providing an up-to-date introduction to the major concepts that form the foundations of condensed materials. The main foundational principles are emphasized, providing students with the knowledge beginners in the field should understand. The book is structured in four parts and allows students to appreciate how the concepts in this broad area build upon each other to produce a cohesive whole as they work through the chapters. Illustrations work closely with the text to convey concepts and ideas visually, enhancing student understanding of difficult material, and end-of-chapter exercises varying in difficulty allow students to put into practice the theory they have covered in each chapter and reinforce new concepts.

Post Other :