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Catalogue of the Barton Collection, Boston Public Library
by Boston Public Library. Barton Collection


Bel Ami
by Guy de Maupassant

Young, attractive and very ambitious, George Duroy, known to his friends as Bel-Ami, is offered a job as a journalist on La Vie francaise and soon makes a great success of his new career. But he also comes face to face with the realities of the corrupt society in which he lives – the sleazy colleagues, the manipulative mistresses and wily financiers – and swiftly learns to become an arch-seducer, blackmailer and social climber in a world where love is only a means to an end. Written when Maupassant was at the height of his powers, Bel-Ami is a novel of great frankness and cynicism, but it is also infused with the sheer joy of life – depicting the scenes and characters of Paris in the belle epoque with wit, sensitivity and humanity. Guy de Maupassant was born in Normandy in 1850. At his parents’ separation he stayed with his mother, who was a friend of Flaubert. As a young man he was lively and athletic, but the first symptoms of syphilis appeared in the late 1870s. By this time Maupassant had become Flaubert’s pupil in the art of prose. On the publication of the first short story to which he put his name, ‘Boule de suif’, he left his job in the civil service and his temporary alliance with the disciples of Zola at Medan, and devoted his energy to professional writing. In the next eleven years he published dozens of articles, nearly three hundred stories and six novels, the best known of which are A Woman’s Life, Bel-Ami and Pierre and Jean. He led a hectic social life, lived up to his reputation for womanizing and fought his disease. By 1889 his friends saw that his mind was in danger, and in 1891 he attempted suicide and was committed to an asylum in Paris, where he died two years later.

Explorations and Encounters in French
by Federation of Associations of Teachers of French in Australia. Conference

“With a title derived literally from the explorations of the French in the Pacific and metaphorically from classroom encounters with another culture – both of which form important subsections to the volume – Explorations and Encounters in French actively seeks to unite those fields of enquiry sometimes seen as separate, namely, culture and language. The essays selected for inclusion in Explorations and Encounters in French bring together many of the current research strands in French Studies today, tapping into current pedagogical trends, analysing contemporary events in France, examining the Franco-Australian past, while reviewing teaching practice and the culture of teaching. Collectively, the essays reflect the common engagement with language, culture and society that characterizes the community of French teachers and scholars in Australia and abroad.”–University of Adelaide Press webpage.

Tartuffe
by Jean-Baptiste Poquelin Molière

When the seemingly perfect Tartuffe ingratiates himself with the wealthy Orgon and his mother Madame Pernelle, he is soon welcomed into their home and into their lives. His combination of charm, respectability and religious authority proves so irresistible that he is eventually promised the hand of Orgon’s daughter in marriage. But the rest of Orgon’s family have grave doubts – is there more to Tartuffe than meets the eye? When the threat of eviction for the family and imprisonment for Orgon become apparent, is it all too late to find out?

This hilarious and irreverent whirlwind of lies, religious hypocrisy and family feuds features one of theatre’s most perfect comedy creations, the beguiling Tartuffe.


The Cid
by Pierre Corneille

A Literal Translation by Roscoe Mongan, 1896 Show Excerpt n, the history of thy life. This just punishment of impertinent language will serve as no small embellishment for it. Scene V.–DON DIEGO. O rage! O despair! O inimical old age! Have I then lived so long only for this disgrace? And have I grown grey in warlike toils, only to see in one day so many of my laurels wither? Does my arm [i.e. my valor], which all Spain admires and looks up to [_lit._ with respect]–[does] my arm, which has so often saved this empire, and so often strengthened anew the throne of its king, now [_lit._ then] betray my cause, and do nothing for me? O cruel remembrance of my bygone glory! O work of a lifetime [_lit._ so many days] effaced in a day! new dignity fatal to my happiness! lofty precipice from which mine honor falls! must I see the count triumph over your splendor, and die without vengeance, or live in shame? Count, be now the instructor of my prince! This high rank becomes [_lit._ admits] no man without honor, and thy jealous pride, by this foul [_lit._ remarkable] in

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