Milibris Reader Pdf Download

So Many Books
by Gabriel Zaid

"Gabriel Zaid’s defense of books is genuinely exhilarating. It is not pious, it is wise; and its wisdom is delivered with extraordinary lucidity and charm. This is how Montaigne would have written about the dizzy and increasingly dolorous age of the Internet. May So Many Books fall into so many hands."—Leon Wieseltier

"Reading liberates the reader and transports him from his book to a reading of himself and all of life. It leads him to participate in conversations, and in some cases to arrange them…It could even be said that to publish a book is to insert it into the middle of a conversation."—from So Many Books

Join the conversation! In So Many Books, Gabriel Zaid offers his observations on the literary condition: a highly original analysis of the predicament that readers, authors, publishers, booksellers, librarians, and teachers find themselves in today—when there are simply more books than any of us can contemplate.

"With cascades of books pouring down on him from every direction, how can the twenty-first-century reader keep his head above water? Gabriel Zaid answers that question in a variety of surprising ways, many of them witty, all of them provocative."—Anne Fadiman, Author of Ex-Libris

"A truly original book about books. Destined to be a classic!"—Enrique Krauze, Author of Mexico: Biography of Power, Editor of Letras Libres

"Gabriel Zaid’s small gem of a book manages to be both delectable and useful, like chocolate fortified with vitamins. His rare blend of wisdom and savvy practical sense should make essential and heartening reading for anyone who cares about the future of books and the life of the mind."—Lynne Sharon Schwartz, Author of Ruined by Reading: A Life in Books

"Gabriel Zaid is a marvelously elegant and playful writer—a cosmopolitan critic with sound judgment and a light touch. He is a jewel of Latin American letters, which is no small thing to be. Read him—you’ll see."—Paul Berman

"’So many books,’ a phrase usually muttered with despair, is transformed into an expression of awe and joy by Gabriel Zaid. Arguing that books are the essential part of the great conversation we call culture and civilization, So Many Books reminds us that reading (and, by extension, writing and publishing) is a business, a vanity, a vocation, an avocation, a moral and political act, a hedonistic pursuit, all of the aforementioned, none of the aforementioned, and is often a miracle."—Doug Dutton

"Zaid traces the preoccupation with reading back through Dr. Johnson, Seneca, and even the Bible (‘Of making many books there is no end’). He emerges as a playful celebrant of literary proliferation, noting that there is a new book published every thirty seconds, and optimistically points out that publishers who moan about low sales ‘see as a failure what is actually a blessing: The book business, unlike newspapers, films, or television, is viable on a small scale.’ Zaid, who claims to own more than ten thousand books, says he has sometimes thought that ‘a chastity glove for authors who can’t contain themselves’ would be a good idea. Nonetheless, he cheerfully opines that ‘the truly cultured are capable of owning thousands of unread books without losing their composure or their desire for more.’"—New Yorker


Stories About Storytellers
by Douglas Gibson

Now available in paperback, with a new chapter and reading guide 

Douglas Gibson, the editor behind Canada’s greatest literary talents, is a terrific storyteller himself. Through his recollections we get an inside view of Canadian politics and publishing that rarely gets told, from Jack Hodgins’ Vancouver Island to Harold Horwood’s Labrador, from Alice Munro’s Ontario to James Houston’s Arctic. Doug Gibson takes us on an unforgettable literary tour of Canada, going behind the scenes and between the covers, and opening up his own story vault for all to read and enjoy. 

This new format edition includes a new chapter on Terry Fallis, as well as the Stories About Storytellers Book Club: intriguing questions (laced with Gibson’s own analysis and behind-the-scenes insight) about each of five celebrated Canadian works of fiction discussed in Stories About Storytellers. These include Alice Munro’s The Progress of Love, Mavis Gallant’s Home Truths, Hugh MacLennan’s The Watch That Ends the Night, Robertson Davies’ What’s Bred in the Bone, and Alistair MacLeod’s No Great Mischief.


Memoir from Antproof Case
by Mark Helprin

An old American who lives in Brazil is writing his memoirs. An English teacher at the naval academy, he is married to a woman young enough to be his daughter and has a little son whom he loves. He sits in a mountain garden in Niterói, overlooking the ocean.

As he reminisces and writes, placing the pages carefully in his antproof case, we learn that he was a World War II ace who was shot down twice, an investment banker who met with popes and presidents, and a man who was never not in love. He was the thief of the century, a murderer, and a protector of the innocent. And all his life he waged a valiant, losing, one-man battle against the world’s most insidious enslaver: coffee.

Mark Helprin combines adventure, satire, flights of transcendence, and high comedy in this “memoir” of a man whose life reads like the song of the twentieth century.


Étale Cohomology (PMS-33)
by James S. Milne

One of the most important mathematical achievements of the past several decades has been A. Grothendieck’s work on algebraic geometry. In the early 1960s, he and M. Artin introduced étale cohomology in order to extend the methods of sheaf-theoretic cohomology from complex varieties to more general schemes. This work found many applications, not only in algebraic geometry, but also in several different branches of number theory and in the representation theory of finite and p-adic groups. Yet until now, the work has been available only in the original massive and difficult papers. In order to provide an accessible introduction to étale cohomology, J. S. Milne offers this more elementary account covering the essential features of the theory.

The author begins with a review of the basic properties of flat and étale morphisms and of the algebraic fundamental group. The next two chapters concern the basic theory of étale sheaves and elementary étale cohomology, and are followed by an application of the cohomology to the study of the Brauer group. After a detailed analysis of the cohomology of curves and surfaces, Professor Milne proves the fundamental theorems in étale cohomology — those of base change, purity, Poincaré duality, and the Lefschetz trace formula. He then applies these theorems to show the rationality of some very general L-series.

Originally published in 1980.

The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.


Poetsee
by Jones Cropper

In poetSee, Jones Cropper has written some of the most heartfelt collections of original short poems brought to you in a series of books. Jones plays with the words he chooses in his poems. You will discover his thoughts, feelings, emotions, and creativity as you read through these books.

Post Other :